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Supply and Demand Side Energy Management Successes at the University of Texas at Austin
Supply and Demand Side Energy Management Successes at the University of Texas at Austin

Supply and Demand Side Energy Management Successes at the University of Texas at Austin

Abstract

The Energy Management and Optimization team at the University of Texas at Austin optimizes both the supply and demand sides of energy use on campus.

Despite The University’s storied CHP and district cooling successes, the following ongoing advancements have demonstrated a further 10-15% CHW production efficiency improvement from our 0.66kW/ton average.
-    Geographically-targeted flow control improvements at CS5 to substantially
reduce overall campus DP.
-    CS5.3 VSD retrofit and flow balancing strategy w/CS6.
-    Controls strategies allowing charge/discharge synchronization of multiple,
hydraulically-diverse TES installations to optimize power peak-shaving.
-    Reducing chiller lift via weather-based CHW temperature and pressure
resets.
-    New CTG8 IAC coil, with selection targeted at enabling year-round CHWS
reset.

Demand-side efforts have resulted in overall EUI reduction of 20% since 2011.
This has been achieved through reprogramming existing sequence of operations, HVAC scheduling, lighting retrofits, and new construction commissioning.
•    At the Performing Arts Center, over 1000 incandescent, halogen, and CFL
lamps were replaced with LEDs alongside re-sequencing HVAC controls and scheduling of large events at Bass Concert Hall.
•    Target EUIs for new construction were used to catch high energy use in
the Health Learning Building during the commissioning phase that reduced the building energy use by 23%.

Presented By

Adam Keeling, P.E.
Demand Side Energy Manager
University of Texas at Austin

Adam manages the Demand Side Energy Management and Optimization team at the University of Texas at Austin. He is a professionally licensed energy engineer, CEM, and CVMP, with 10 years of experience working in demand-side energy management, in the utility and higher education industry as well as residential home performance. He has a Master of Science focused in Architectural Engineering; Building Energy & Environments from The University of Texas at Austin.

Nick Schroeder, P.E., C.E.M., C.M.V.P.
Energy Manager
University of Texas at Austin

Nick has served as UT Austin’s plants Energy Manager since 2016, where he supports several optimization and analysis platforms vital to UEM’s mission, including Optimum Energy, TERMIS, and Plant Health Index.  Mr. Schroeder is a registered Professional Engineer in Texas, a certified CEM and CMVP, and has 15 years’ experience designing and managing complex air and water-side mechanical systems for hospitals, data centers, central utility plants, and higher education research facilities.